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New F-45 Now In Development

Updated June 30, 2015

A new F-45 cruising catamaran design is now under development, loosely based on the F-44, but it has fast become a brand new design, with completely
revised lines and many other improvements. The F-44 was in turn based on the F-41 which is now a well proven ocean going design, one having sailed
trans Pacific from Australia to the US, and one from Europe to New Zealand. The owner of Multihulls Direct, had already built his own F-44SC, and
while now sold, another order had come in from Cooper Boating in Canada for their fleet, and it was a good time to go one better.

The F-44SC is one of the fastest boats in Subic bay with a top speed so far of 23 knots. This boat is however used
primarily for cruising, and it is light (note how high the transoms clear the water) which makes it a great and fast
cruiser. The new 2015 F-45 will also have a curved foil option, plus an all carbon F-45R with a taller 69' mast will
be another option.

The build has started at Multihull Direct's factory at Clark Free Port Zone in the Philippines. Four building stocks are
being used, for inner and outer hulls, plus bridge deck and upper cabin. Construction will be all hand vacuum bagged
epoxy foam core, with a standard of finish inside and out equal to the F-33.

Setting up the building Form Frames - inner hull on left, outer hull on right. This split building method was
developed for the original F-41, and is a much more efficient way of building cat hulls than the traditional
upside down method. The outer hull half and deck sides can then be built as one piece (no gunwale join)
while the inner hull half and bridgedeck are also built as one piece (no weak bridgedeck to hull join). Better
still, the joined sections (for kits) can be containerized very efficiently, ready for assembly at the destination.

Inner hull is shown being built on its side (as it was with the original F-41) which allowed the same form
frames to be used for both sides. However, two sets of Form Frames are being used for the F-45, and this
allows the F-45 inner hull to be built vertically, which takes up less floor space,

Joining the hulls. They are then stood upright, and assembled with the upper cabin and center bridgedeck
section as shown below in an original F-41 drawing

The first outer hull being planked

Full production molds may be looked at in the future, but the F-45 can be built much lighter for now, by avoiding the need for gelcoat.
Fortunatelythe Philippine workers are very efficient, and can achieve an outstanding and more durable seamless finish by hand as shown below:

F-44SC shown in Subic Bay as built by Multihulls Direct

No further details are available at present otherwise, as the F-45 is a new design that is still in process. and there is not much time for promotional
drawings or details. However, the basic standard profile plus a body view are below, and more details will be released as it takes shape.

The standard F-45 is shown

Body view showing the curved foils, which give vertical lift as well as lateral resistance. Better again,
they take up less interior room than a vertical daggerboard

Provisional Specifications


L.O.A...................................... 45' 6"(13.87m)
B.O.A...................................... 24' (7.32m)
L.W.L...................................... 44' 3" (13.5m)
Full Load. Displ (DWL)......... 19,700lbs (8950kg)
Sail Area (Main and jib).......... 980sq.ft (91sq.m.)
F-45 Mast Height..................... 58' (17.7m)
F-45R Mast Height.................. 69' (21m)
Draft (board up)...................... 1' 11" (0.58m)
Draft (Board down)................. 7' 8" (2.33m)
Draft with Curved foil down... 8' 9" (2.65m)
Bridgedeck Clearance............. 3' 1" (0.94m) at full load

Nothing further is available at this time, and if interested in receiving future information
or updates as they become available then please submit a request for 'Future F-45 Info'
in the comment line of the contact form below, or send an email:

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